Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Marjoram

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:19 pm

Marjoram: Is the graygreen leaf of Majorana hortensis, a low growing member of the mint family. It is often mistaken for oregano, although they are not the same plant.

Geographical Sources: United States and France

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Marjoram is used as a flavoring for meat dishes.

Taste and Aroma: Marjoram has a delicate, sweet, pleasant flavor with a slightly bitter undertone.

History/Region of Origin: Marjoram is indigenous to the Mediterranean area and was known to the Greeks and Romans, who looked on it as a symbol of happiness. It was said that if marjoram grew on the grave of a dead person, he would enjoy eternal bliss.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Crush in your hand or with a mortar and pestle before using. Marjoram's mellow taste and enticing fragrance make it compatible with a wide variety of foods. It won't overpower: start with 1/2 teaspoon per 4 servings. Complements lamb dishes, as well as beef and veal. Marjoram blends well with parsley, dill, basil, or thyme. Try it in soups or stews.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Mint

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:22 pm

Mint: Is the dried leaf of a perennial herb. There are two important species, Mentha spicata L. (spearmint) and Mentha piperita L. (peppermint).

Geographical Sources: United States

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Mint jelly served with lamb, sprinkled in peas, or in chocolate desserts.

Taste and Aroma: Mint is strong and sweet with a tangy flavor and a cool after taste.

History/Region of Origin: Spearmint and peppermint are both native to Asia. Peppermint was used by Eyptians, and spearmint is mentioned in the Bible. Spearmint grew wild in the United States after the 1600s, and peppermint was cultivated commercially before the Civil War.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Use mint in salad dressings, flavored tea, and zesty marinades. Stir into warmed apple or currant jelly for a quick meat sauce or dessert topping.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Mustard Seed

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:27 pm

Mustard Seed: Comes from two large shrubs, Brassica juncea (brown mustard) and Brassica hirta (white mustard), native to Asia. Both plants produce bright yellow flowers that contain small round seeds; brown mustard is more pungent than white.

Geographical Sources: Canada

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Mustard Seed's hot and spicy flavor enhances meats, fish, fowl, sauces, and salad dressings. Whole Mustard Seed may be used in pickling or in boiling vegetables such as cabbage or sauerkraut. Brown Mustard Seeds are an important flavoring in Indian dishes.

Taste and Aroma: Powdered Mustard has no aroma when dry, but a hot flavor is released when it is mixed with water.

History/Region of Origin: Mustard was used in ancient Greece and Rome as a medicine and a flavoring. By 800 AD, the French were using Mustard as an enhancement for drab meals and salted meats. It was one of the spices taken on Spanish explorations during the 1400s. Mustard powder was invented by Mrs. Clements of Durham, England, who made a fortune selling the dry, paleyellow mustard flour.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Before using, mix Mustard Powder with water to form a paste. It takes about 10 minutes for the mustard flavor to develop. Use in foods needing flavor highlights. Unlike other pungent spices, Mustard's flavor does not build or persist. Mustard helps emulsify liquids use in salad dressing recipes to help blend oil and vinegar and add a spicy zip.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Nutmeg

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:30 pm

Nutmeg: Is the seed of Myristica fragrans, an evergreen tree native to the Molucca Islands. Interestingly, the tree produces both Nutmeg and mace, and grows up to 60 feet tall. Although the tree takes seven years to bear fruit, it may produce until the 90th year. Both spices come from the tree?s fruit, which splits into a scarlet outer membrane, mace, and an inner brown seed, Nutmeg.

Geographical Sources: Nutmeg is grown in Indonesia and Grenada.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Nutmeg is a mild baking spice and is used in sausages, meats, soups, and preserves. Nutmeg is commonly added to eggnog, puddings, and fruit pies. It is popular in The Netherlands and Italy, where it is used in vegetables, puddings, and stews.

Taste and Aroma: Nutmeg is more pungent and sweeter than mace.

History/Region of Origin: The Roman philosopher Pliny wrote about Nutmeg and mace in the first century. Indian Vedic literature recommended Nutmeg for bad breath, headaches, and fever. Arabian writing mentions its uses as an aphrodisiac and stomach medicine. Middle Eastern traders brought Nutmeg and mace to Southern Europe in the sixth century, and they were wellknown by the twelfth century from Italy to Denmark. The Portuguese found Nutmeg trees in the Molucca Islands, and dominated the Nutmeg and mace trade until the Dutch overcame it in 1602. Unaware that the spices came from one tree, one Dutch official ordered the Moluccan islanders to plant more mace trees, and fewer Nutmeg trees. Nutmeg production spread to the West Indies, Trinidad, and Grenada under the British in the 1800s.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: The sweet but slightly bitter flavor of Nutmeg adds chracter to vegetables. A little goes a long way so try 1/8 teaspoon per 4 servings to start. Just sprinkle it lightly over veal, fish, or chicken for a surprising snap. Use as a topping for whipped cream, custard, and eggnog. Ground Nutmeg is an ideal baking spice and is especially complimentary in sweet breads, cakes, muffins, cookies, and fruit pies.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Onion

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:33 pm

Onion: The familiar and popular onion is a bulb of Allium cepa, a low growing plant. Botanists classify it in either the lily family or the amaryllis family.

Geographical Sources: Onions are grown worldwide, including the United States.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Onions are popular everywhere and are used as both a condiment and a vegetable in almost any savory food.

Taste and Aroma: Fresh onions are pungent and have a sharp bite. Cooked onions lose this heat and develop a rich sweetness.

History/Region of Origin: Onions have been grown since before recorded history. They were fed to workers building pyramids and were found in the tomb of King Tut. Onions are noted in the Bible as one of the foods most longed for by the Israelites after leaving Egypt for the Promised Land. They have been enjoyed by most cultures throughout history. Christopher Columbus brought Onions with him to the Americas. Their popularity quickly spread among native American cultures.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Use Onions in almost anything except sweets! Dried Onion can be added straight to liquids, but should be rehydrated before being added to drier dishes such as casseroles and stirfries. Rehydrating them also increases potency. Onions make the perfect foundation for meats, poultry, soups, salads, and stews. Dried Onions release flavor more rapidly than freshly chopped Onions when added to a recipe.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Oregano

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 7:36 pm

Oregano: Mediterranean Oregano is the dried leaf of Origanum vulgare L., a perennial herb in the mint family. Mexican Oregano is the dried leaf of one of several plants of the Lippia genus.

Geographical Sources: Oregano is grown in California and New Mexico, as well as the Mediterranean region.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Oregano is the spice that gives pizza its characteristic flavor. It is also usually used in chili powder.

Taste and Aroma: Oregano has a pungent odor and flavor. Mexican Oregano is a bit stronger than Mediterranean Oregano.

History/Region of Origin: Mediterranean Oregano was originaly grown extensively in Greece and Italy. Since Greek and Roman times it has been used with meats, fish, vegetables, and as a flavoring for wine. Before World War II, Oregano was almost unknown in the United States. However, its popularity skyrocketed with the popularity of pizza.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Oregano tastes great with tomato, egg, or cheese based foods, and is also a great addition to many lamb, pork, and beef main dishes. Try sauteeing aromatic vegetables in olive oil with garlic and Oregano. You can make a savory sauce with melted butter, lemon juice and a bit of Oregano; drizzle it over grilled fish and poultry. An easy way to accent pasta sauces, salad dressings, and ground meat dishes is with a dusting of crushed Oregano leaves. To release its flavor, crush Oregano by hand or with a mortar and pestle before using it in your recipes.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Paprika

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:02 pm

Paprika: Is a spice which comes from a mild red pepper in the family Capsicum annum. It is a brilliant red powder and often used as a garnish.

Geographical Sources: The peppers used in Paprika are grown in Hungary, Spain, South America, and California.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Paprika is the main flavor in Hungarian cooking, including dishes such as Goulash and Chicken Paprikash. In the United States, it is often used as a garnish on stuffed eggs, fish, and cheese and vegetable casseroles. Spanish Paprika flavors shellfish, rice, and sausage dishes. In Morocco, Paprika is used in tomato dishes and salads.

Taste and Aroma: Paprika ranges from sweet and mild to hot. American Paprika is the blandest, while Hungarian Paprika has the greatest range of flavor.

History/Region of Origin: Paprika, as a member of the capsicum family, is indigenous to the Western Hemisphere. The pepper is grown widely and takes on a slightly different flavor depending on local soil and climatic conditions.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Paprika is useful as a simple garnish for almost any savory dish. Combine it with butter, margarine, or oil for a quick baste for fish or poultry. This is especially good on roast turkey. Paprika can be mixed with bread crumbs before sprinkling them over casseroles or vegetables.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Parsley

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:05 pm

Parsley: Is the dried leaf of Petroselinum crispum, a biennial in the parsley family.

Geographical Sources: Parsley is grown in California.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Parsley is most popular as a garnish and is an excellent breath freshener. It is high in vitamins A and C, and contains iron, iodine, and copper.

Taste and Aroma: Parsley has a light, fresh scent and flavor.

History/Region of Origin: Parsley was cultivated as early as the third century BC. The Romans used Parsley as a garnish and flavoring. They put it on their tables and around their necks in the belief the leaves would absorb fumes. Medieval Europeans believed that one could kill an enemy by plucking a sprig while speaking the person?s name. It spread to the Americas in the 17th century, where it now grows plentifully. It is the most widely used culinary herb in the United States. Parsley is difficult to process because it takes twelve pounds of fresh Parsley to make one pound of dried. However, more people still use dried Parsley than fresh leaves as a garnish in soups, salads, meats, vegetables, and sauces.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Stretch homemade pesto and other green sauces by adding a generous amount of Parsley during mixing. Stir Parsley into melted garlic butter for a savory, yet simple, pasta or steamed vegetable topper. Add directly to liquids, cooked foods, melted butter, and salad dressings for a light spicy touch. Try a nosalt herb blend by combining 1 tablespoon each Parsley Flakes, marjoram, and thyme. Crush Parsley in your hand or with a mortar and pestle before adding to food.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Pepper

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:10 pm

Pepper: Is the dried berry of Piper nigrum. This vine which can grow up to ten feet tall is indigenous to India and Asia. Pepper is actually berries that are picked about nine months after flowering. (This is true pepper, and should not be confused with paprika, cayenne pepper, chili pepper, red pepper, and bell pepper, which are fruits from the capiscum family.) Black Pepper, the spiciest, is berries that are picked unripe. The berries used for White Pepper are ripened on the vine and soaked so that their outer hulls are easily removed. Green Peppercorns are immature berries which are freezedried or packed in brine for preservation.

Geographical Sources: Pepper is grown in India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brazil.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Pepper is a universal table condiment used to flavor all types of dishes in cuisines worldwide. It's commonly used in stocks, pickling, and sausages.

Taste and Aroma: Black Pepper has a sharp, pungent aroma and flavor. White Pepper is hotter, less subtle and mildly fermented. Green Peppercorn is milder in flavor and has a fresh taste.

History/Region of Origin: Since the Roman times, Pepper has been the most important spice. The cities of Alexandria, Genoa, and Venice owed their economic success to Pepper. Three thousand year old Sanskrit literature mentions Pepper. It was one of the earliest items traded Asia and Europe. In 1101, victorious Genovese soldiers were each given two pounds of Pepper as a gift for their successful Palestinian conquest. In the Middle Ages, Europeans often used Pepper to pay rent, dowries, and taxes, and Shakespeare mentions Pepper in his plays. The need for Pepper inspired Spanish exploration and spice trade in the 15th century.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Coarsely crack Whole Peppercorns with side of a wide chef's knife and rub on to steaks and chops. Create a unique flavor depth in spice cakes, gingerbreads, and ginger cookies with a pinch of finely ground Black Pepper. Use Black Pepper to spark barbecue sauces, meat marinades, and vegetable stirfries. Sprinkle over chowders, cream soups, and tomato and egg dishes. Mix with sour cream or yogurt for a lively baked potato or vegetable topper. Add Whole Black Peppercorns to soups and stews, and the liquid used to poach seafood, meat, and poultry. Simmer Whole Black Peppercorns in fresh fruit compotes for a delicate, warm spiciness.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Poppy Seeds

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:14 pm

Poppy Seeds: Are tiny nuttytasting, bluegray seeds inside capsules on Papaver somniferum, a yellowishbrown opium plant indigenous to the Mediterranean.

Geographical Sources: Poppies are native to Mediterranean regions, India, China, Turkey, and Iran. Today, Holland and Canada are the main producers of poppy seeds.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Poppy Seeds are used to flavor breads, cakes, rolls, and cookies in European and Middle Eastern cooking. In Turkey, they are often ground and used in desserts. In India, the seeds are ground and used to thicken sauces. The seeds are also used in noodle, fish, and vegetable dishes in Jewish, German, and Slavic cooking.

Taste and Aroma: Poppy Seeds have a slightly nutty aroma and taste.

History/Region of Origin: Since antiquity, poppies have symbolized honor. Women in second century Crete cultivated poppy plants for opium and Hippocrates suggested opium in medicine. Islamic and Arabian countries used opium as a medicine and narcotic in the sixth century. By the 17th century, Asians used the poppy plant as an opiate. Europeans began trafficking the drug in the 19th century, culminating in the Opium Wars, in which China lost control of the industry. The Greeks used the seeds as flavoring for breads in the second century, and medieval Europeans used them as a condiment with breads.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Poppy Seeds are a classic addition to buttered egg noodles, fruit salad dressings, and fragrant yeast breads. Poppy Seeds add nutty flavor and texture to cookies, cakes, breads, strudels, pastry crusts, and pancake and waffle batters.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Red Pepper

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:26 pm

Red Pepper: Is made from the ground fruit of a plant in the Capsicum family. The fruits, commonly known as "chilies" or "chili peppers," are fiery red or orange pods which rarely grow to more than 4 inches in length.

The ground product ranges from orangered, to deep, dark red. According to the American Spice Trade Association, "Red Pepper" is the preferred name for all hot red pepper spices. Cayenne Pepper is another name for the same type of product. Some manufacturers use the term Cayenne Pepper to refer to a hotter version of Red Pepper.

Geographical Sources: China, Japan, India, Mexico, Africa, and Louisiana

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Red Pepper is used to achieve the characteristically hot flavor of Mexican, Creole, Cajun, Thai, Szechuan, and Indian cooking. It also is used in chili, Spanish rice, and barbecue sauce as well as meats, salads, and casseroles.

Taste and Aroma: Red pepper is a pungent, hot powder with a strong bite.

History/Region of Origin: Capsicum peppers are native to Mexico, Central America, the West Indies, and parts of South America. The Spanish discovered the pods in the New World and brought them back to Europe. Before the arrival of Spaniards, Indians in Peru and Guatemala used capsicum medicinally to treat stomach and other ailments.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Use small amounts of Red Pepper. It is a biting condiment, and the flavor intensifies as it is cooked. For a spicy snack, add ground Red Pepper and salt to hot oil; saute blanched almonds until golden. Or add a dash of Red Pepper, onion, cheese, and bacon to beaten eggs for scrambled eggs or omelet. Try adding Red Pepper to barbecue steak sauce. Use it to marinate or baste steaks.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Rosemary

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:31 pm

Rosemary: Is an herb in the mint family. It is a small evergreen shrub, Rosmarinus officinalis, whose 1inch leaves resemble curved pine needles.

Geographical Sources: Rosemary is native to the Mediterranean. Today it is widely produced in France, Spain, and Portugal.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Rosemary is used primarily in Italy in lamb, pork, chicken, and rabbit dishes.

Taste and Aroma: Rosemary has a tealike aroma and a piney flavor.

History/Region of Origin: Rosemary's name is rooted in legend. The story goes that during her flight from Egypt, the Virgin Mary draped her blue cloak on a Rosemary bush. She then laid a white flower on top of the cloak. That night, the flower turned blue and the bush was thereafter known as the "rose of Mary". Greeks, who wove Rosemary wreaths into their hair, believed Rosemary strengthened the brain and enhanced memory. It was also known as a symbol of fidelity. In the Middle Ages, Rosemary was used medicinally and as a condiment for salted meats. In Europe, wedding parties burned Rosemary as incense. Judges burned it to protect against illness brought in by prisoners.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Rosemary's assertive flavor blends well with garlic to season lamb roasts, meat stews, and marinades. Rosemary also enlivens lighter fish dishes, tomato sauces, and vegetables. Melt butter with Rosemary to dress freshly steamed red potatoes and peas or a stirfried mixture of zucchini and summer squash. Crush leaves by hand or with a mortar and pestle before using.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Saffron

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 8:34 pm

Saffron: Is the stigma of Crocus sativus, a flowering plant in the crocus family. Saffron, the world's most expensive spice, is costly because more than 225,000 stigmas must be hand picked to produce one pound. In its pure form, saffron is a mass of compressed, threadlike, dark orange strands.

Geographical Sources: Saffron is native to the Mediterranean. Today it is cultivated primarily in Spain.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Saffron is used in French bouillabaisse, Spanish paella, Milanese risotto, and many Middle Eastern dishes.

Taste and Aroma: Saffron has a spicy, pungent, and bitter flavor with a sharp and penetrating odor.

History/Region of Origin: Ancient Greeks and Romans scattered Saffron to perfume public baths. The 13th century Crusaders brought Saffron from Asia to Europe, where it was used as a dye and condiment. In Asia, Saffron was a symbol of hospitality. In India, people used Saffron to mark themselves as members of a wealthy caste.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: A little pinch goes a long way with Saffron. Use it in Italian risottos, Spanish chicken and rice, French seafood stews and Scandinavian sweet breads.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Sage

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:06 pm

Sage: Is an herb from an evergreen shrub, Salvia officinalis, in the mint family. Its long, grayishgreen leaves take on a velvety, cottonlike texture when rubbed (meaning ground lightly and passed through a coarse sieve).

Geographical Sources: Sage is grown in the United States. It also is grown in Dalmatia and Albania.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Sage enhances pork, lamb, meats, and sausages. Chopped leaves flavor salads, pickles, and cheese. It is one of the most popular herbs in the United States.

Taste and Aroma: Sage has a fragrant aroma and an astringent but warm flavor.

History/Region of Origin: The name "Sage" comes from the Latin word ?salia, meaning to save. Greeks and Romans used it to cure snake bites and to invigorate the mind and body. In the Middle Ages, people drank Sage in tea and used Sage to treat colds, fevers, liver trouble, and epilepsy. Although Sage is no longer used medicinally, it has become one of the world's most popular herbs.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Crumble leaves for full fragrance. Use ground Sage sparingly; foods absorb its flavor more quickly than leaf Sage. Sage is a wonderful flavor enhancer for seafood, vegetables, breadsticks, cornbreads, muffins, and other savory breads. Top swordfish, tuna, steaks, chicken, and turkey pieces with Sagelemon butter. Rub Sage, cracked pepper, and garlic into pork tenderloin or chops before cooking.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Sesame Seed

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:08 pm

Sesame Seed: Is the seed of an annual herb, Sesamum indicum, which grows well in hot climates. Sesame Seed is the most commonly produced seed. The yellowish, red, or black seeds are used in bread products, stir-fries, Jewish and Chinese confectionaries, and Middle Eastern dishes.

Geographical Sources: Africa and Indonesia

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Sesame Seed has been enjoyed by humans since the dawn of civilization. It is used in breads, candies, main dishes, as a garnish on pasta and vegetables, and for its oil content.

Taste and Aroma: Sesame Seeds have a nut-like, mild flavor.

History/Region of Origin: Sesame Seed is probably the oldest crop grown for its taste, dating back 2000 years to China. The Egyptians used Sesame Seed as medicine around the same time. The Turks used its oil in 900 BC. The term open sesame first appeared in the Arabian book "The Thousand and One Nights." The phrase refers to the seeds' ability to pop, at the slightest touch, when ripe. Sesame was imported from India to Europe during the first century. Persians used sesame oil because they had no olive oil. Africans, who called it benne, brought it with them to the United States in the 17th century during the slave trade.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Sesame Seeds are easy to toast. Place them in a pan and stir over meduim heat for a minute or two until they brown lightly. Add Sesame Seeds to cookie doughs, pie pastry, and yeast breads. Sprinkle over creamed spinach, buttered noodles, eggplant dishes, and mixed vegetable stir-fries. Blend with butter or mayonnaise to make a nutty spread for chicken, turkey, or tuna sandwiches.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Summer Savory

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:11 pm

Summer Savory: Is an annual herb, Satureja hotenis, belonging to the mint family. Its dark-green, narrow leaves are dried and crushed.

Geographical Sources: United States and Yugoslavia

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Summer Savory enhances almost any savory dish. It goes well with soups, stews, bean dishes of any sort, succotash, cabbage, and sauerkraut.

Taste and Aroma: Summer Savory has a clean, piney fragrance and peppery flavor.

History/Region of Origin: Romans used Savory as an herb and seasoning even before they used pepper. They used it as a medicine, a bee sting treatment, and an aphrodisiac. When the Romans brought it to England, it was used as an ingredient in stuffing rather than as an herbal remedy.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Spark heavy stews, soups, and chowders with a garnish of Summer Savory. Top chilled, poached fish or chicken with a blend of Summer Savory, chives, lemon juice, and mayonnaise. Crush Summer Savory in your hand or with a mortar and pestle before use to release the flavor.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Tarragon

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:13 pm

Tarragon: Is a small, shrubby herb, Artemisia dracunculus, in the sunflower family. Two species are cultivated, Russian and French. Leaves of the French variety are glossier and more pungent. Most commercial Tarragon comes from dried leaves of the French Tarragon plant.

Geographical Sources: Tarragon is native to southern Russia and western Asia. Today, its primary producer is France.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Tarragon is commonly known as a flavoring for vinegar and is used in pickles, relishes, prepared mustards, and sauces. Tarragon also goes well with fish, meat, soups and stews, and is often used in tomato and egg dishes. Tarragon adds distinctive flavor to sauces.

Taste and Aroma: Tarragon has a slightly bittersweet flavor and an aroma similar to anise.

History/Region of Origin: Tarragon, unlike many other herbs, was not used by ancient peoples. It was mentioned briefly in medieval writings as a pharmaceutical, but did not come into common use until the 16th century in England. It was brought to the United States in the early 19th century.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Tarragon adds flavor to egg and cheese dishes, light soups and fresh fruits. To baste chicken, fish or seafood, blend Tarragon with butter, chives, and lemon.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Thyme

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:16 pm

Thyme: Is the leaf of a low-growing shrub in the mint family called Thymus vulgaris. Its tiny grayish-green leaves rarely are greater than one-fourth inch long. For use as a condiment, Thyme leaves are dried then chopped, or ground.

Geographical Sources: Thyme is grown in southern Europe, inlcuding France, Spain, and Portugal. It is also indigineous to the Mediterranean.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Thyme is often included in seasoning blends for poultry and stuffing and also commonly used in fish sauces, chowders, and soups. It goes well with lamb and veal as well as in eggs, custards, and croquettes. Thyme often is paired with tomatoes.

Taste and Aroma: Thyme has a subtle, dry aroma and a slightly minty flavor.

History/Region of Origin: Ancient Greeks considered Thyme a symbol of courage and sacrifice. Tradition tells that Thyme was in the straw bed of the Virgin Mary and the Christ child. In the Middle Ages, ladies would embroider a sprig of Thyme into scarves they gave to their errant knights. At various periods in history, Thyme has been used to treat melancholy, reproductive system ailments, and to improve digestion. In the 18th century, it was recommended as a cure for a hangover.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Rub minced garlic and Thyme over lamb, pork, or beef roasts. Season cheese, tomato, and egg dishes with Thyme. Blend fragrant Thyme into poultry stuffing, spaghetti or pizza sauce, and chili along with any combination of marjoram, basil, oregano, sage, rosemary, or garlic.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Turmeric

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:19 pm

Turmeric: Comes from the root of Curcuma longa, a leafy plant in the ginger family. The root, or rhizome, has a tough brown skin and bright orange flesh. Ground Tumeric comes from fingers which extend from the root. It is boiled or steamed and then dried, and ground.

Geographical Sources: India is the world's primary producer of Turmeric. It is also grown in China and Indonesia.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Turmeric is a necessary ingredient of curry powder. It is used extensively in Indian dishes, including lentil and meat dishes, and in Southeast Asian cooking. Turmeric is routinely added to mustard blends and relishes. It also is used in place of saffron to provide color and flavor.

Taste and Aroma: Turmeric is mildly aromatic and has scents of orange or ginger. It has a pungent, bitter flavor.

History/Region of Origin: Turmeric, with its brilliant yellow color, has been used as a dye, medicine, and flavoring since 600 BC. In 1280, Marco Polo described Turmeric as "a vegetable with the properties of saffron, yet it is not really saffron." Indonesians used Turmeric to dye their bodies as part of their wedding ritual. Turmeric has been used medicinally throughout Asia to treat stomach and liver ailments. It also was used externally, to heal sores, and as a cosmetic.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: Because of its bitter taste, Turmeric should not be used as a flavor substitute for saffron. A Turmeric stain can be washed out with soap and water if treated quickly. Use Turmeric to add Eastern mystery to new favorites as well as in traditional curries, rice and chicken dishes, and condiments. Turmeric is a classic addition to chutneys, pickles, and relishes. Add a pinch of Turmeric to fish soups. Blend with melted butter and drizzle over cooked vegetables, pasta, or potatoes.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia Vanilla

Post  justmecookin on Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:22 pm

Vanilla: Vanilla Beans are the long, greenish-yellow seed pods of the tropical orchid plant, Vanilla planifolia. Before the plant flowers, the pods are picked, unripe, and cured until they're dark brown. The process takes up to six months. To obtain Pure Vanilla Extract, cured Vanilla Beans are steeped in alcohol. According to law, Pure Vanilla Extract must be 35 percent alcohol by volume.

Geographical Sources: Vanilla beans are grown in Madagascar, Mexico, Indonesia, and Tahiti.

Traditional Ethnic Uses: Vanilla is one of the most popular flavorings in the world. It is used in flavoring most desserts, including ice cream, custard, cake, candy, and pudding. Vanilla is also used to enhance the flavor of beverages and sauces.

Taste and Aroma: Vanilla Beans have a sweet, perfumed aroma with a woody or smoky flavor. Pure Vanilla Extract has a similar aroma.

History/Region of Origin: Vanilla originated in Mexico, where the Aztecs used it to accent the flavor of chocolate drinks. The Mexican emperor, Montezuma, introduced Vanilla to the Spanish explorer Cortez, who brought it to Europe in the 16th century. The drink, made with Vanilla pods and cacao beans, became popular among the aristocracy in Europe. In 1602, a chemist for Queen Elizabeth I suggested that Vanilla could be used alone as a flavoring.

A Few Ideas to Get You Started: One inch of Vanilla Bean is equal to one teaspoon of Pure Vanilla Extract. Vanilla Beans should never be refrigerated because they may develop mold when chilled. They should be kept in an air-tight container at room temperature. Add to desserts or beverages to boost sweet, fruity, or rich flavors. Provides smooth rich background taste - use to balance sauces for shellfish, chicken, and veal. Softens dairy flavors and reduces egginess in French toast and meringues. Add to a mug of hot chocolate, coffee, or tea for added richness.

justmecookin

Number of posts : 14443
Registration date : 2008-04-23
Location : Germany/USA

View user profile http://www.justmecookin.com

Back to top Go down

Re: Herbs and Spices Encyclopedia

Post  Sponsored content Today at 10:46 pm


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 2 of 2 Previous  1, 2

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum